The Maritime Silk Road and South China Sea Disputes
Politics,Hotspots,China
By Hong Zhao - 12 Dec 2016

The Maritime Silk Road and South China Sea Disputes

Southeast Asian countries have two serious concerns which might increase distrust between China and ASEAN, and this may become a bottleneck of the MSR construction. One is about China’s nine-dash line, and the other is whether China is undermining ASEAN’s unity.
Get China to Negotiate with SCS Neighbors: A Message to Trump
Politics,Hotspots

By Mark E. Rosen - 07 Dec 2016

Get China to Negotiate with SCS Neighbors: A Message to Trump

The South China Sea Disputes: What’s Next?
Security,Hotspots,China

By Shicun Wu - 01 Dec 2016

The South China Sea Disputes: What’s Next?

Trump’s Victory and Future of US-Pakistan Relations
Politics,Hotspots

Trump’s Victory and Future of US-Pakistan Relations

What does Trump’s victory mean for Pakistan? Will the coldness in US-Pakistan ties increase further or will they remain at their current level? More importantly, what are the benchmarks to evaluate Trump’s future policies?
By Abdul Basit - 28 Nov 2016 | 0 comments Read more...
US Military Presence in the Asia-Pacific
Security,Hotspots

US Military Presence in the Asia-Pacific

The US’ military deployments and activities in the Asia-Pacific region are important manifestations of its “rebalancing” strategy. Since President Barack Obama took office in 2009, the US global military strategy has been to shift its focus and priority toward the Asia-Pacific region.
What is Hong Kong’s Status?
Politics,Hotspots,East Asia

What is Hong Kong’s Status?

During the swearing-in ceremony of new lawmakers at Hong Kong’s Legislative Council, two lawmakers referred to the former British colony as the “Hong Kong nation.” A pro-Beijing publication translated the word “nation” as “guo” in Chinese. “Guo” or “guojia” can be understood as nation, country, or state.
Trumponomics: A Danger to Prosperity?
Politics,Economy,Hotspots

Trumponomics: A Danger to Prosperity?

Will Donald Trump’s presidency pose a danger to the country’s prosperity? Or will it “make America great again” by doubling US economy’s annual growth to 3.5-4.0 percent?
By Ding Lu - 19 Nov 2016 | 0 comments Read more...
No Restraint: Judicial Activism in the South China Sea Ruling
Security,Hotspots

No Restraint: Judicial Activism in the South China Sea Ruling

Although the tribunal enjoyed ample latitude to carve out a constructive, mid-path interpretation of a critically important but ill-defined provision of maritime law, it chose to indulge in a tortuous train of legal thought that lacked basis in case law and produced a zero-sum outcome that overwhelmingly favored Manila.  
Trump and the South China Sea
Security,Hotspots,China

Trump and the South China Sea

“Make America Great Again” was Trump’s campaign slogan. This probably translates to a Reaganesque “peace through strength” approach. Implementing such a policy in Southeast Asia is likely to be accompanied by blusters, threats and shows of force and gunboat diplomacy.
New Dynamics in ASEAN’s Stance on South China Sea
Security,Hotspots,Southeast Asia

New Dynamics in ASEAN’s Stance on South China Sea

The success of Duterte’s visits to Beijing and Tokyo has initiated new dynamics in ASEAN’s position on the South China Sea issue. The Philippines will assume the rotating chairmanship of ASEAN next year and its success in lowering tensions on the South China Sea issue will likely become the ASEAN stand.
Why the US-China Contest for the South China Sea Is So Dangerous
Security,Hotspots,China

Why the US-China Contest for the South China Sea Is So Dangerous

A debate between Kurt Campbell, the architect of the US pivot to Asia, and Australian strategic thinker Hugh White makes clear that the South China Sea has become the cockpit of US-China competition for domination of Asia. The outcome may determine whose principles, values and “order” will shape the future of Asia.
Elements of a South China Sea Deal: Saving Face and Making Money
Security,Hotspots,China

Elements of a South China Sea Deal: Saving Face and Making Money

Some US academics suggest that a US-China grand bargain to establish a balance of power is a precondition for peace in the South China Sea region. Or, will a legal deal establishing a joint development regime and disengagement from illegal maritime assertions solve most of the current problems?
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